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Figuring out what I wanted to be was a struggle.  I remember in high school posing for a picture for the yearbook by a partial anatomical science model in Mr. Goodchild’s science classroom. One thing is for sure though…I was a geek. Maybe as an adult geeks are better respected. It sure didn’t feel like it as teenager.

Nevertheless, I felt that I needed to accomplish something big. It seemed like science came, especially biology and anatomy, came fairly easy for me. My first anatomy class was a pre-college anatomy class taught by Mr. Jim Goodchild. I remember taking a field trip to see the cadavers in Jorgensen Hall at Union College. It was awesome! Once in college, I found that while I somewhat enjoyed Chemistry and Biochemistry classes, I somehow had a difficult time comprehending how the knowledge we were learning in those classes would apply to clinical medicine. At that time I was still pretty sure I wanted to be a doctor. Not only did it seem like the “cool” thing to do/be, I suspected that it paid well and would be a tremendous way to serve others.

As my classes progressed through another Anatomy and Physiology (A&P) class at the college level I became more fascinated with how the body was built and functioned. I was feeling more convicted to become a physician. Then, the school year ended. That summer I worked as an assistant to Broken Arrow Ranch’s camp wrangler. Ever Wednesday during that summer I would have an afternoon off. I spent many of those afternoons shadowing surgeons and other family practice physicians in Manhattan, KS. I saw several interesting procedures but overall began to fill disillussioned by the use of medications to patch problems rather than address the cause. This began to make me question my decision to become a standard physician and made me wonder if there was a different way for me.

To be continued…